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27 August 2020
How often should my pool be serviced?

Owning a swimming pool is a truly marvellous thing.  With many of us still staying at home at the moment, swimming in your own pool is a fantastic way to keep fit and have fun with your immediate family. During the pandemic, many more people have been enquiring about installing a private pool when it’s safe to do so and one of the primary topics that crops up in discussion is looking after the pool.

Swimming pools are, by nature, harbingers of bacteria that can become quite inhospitable without appropriate servicing.  However, the regularity with which a pool should be serviced is often debated, but with 30 years’ experience servicing and maintaining pools, we know that consistency and regularity of care is paramount in order to keep the pool healthy pool. 

You might assume that because your pool is on the smaller side or doesn’t see much dirt or debris that the pool cleaning chemicals will last longer but that’s not necessarily true. The real skill is in keeping the chemical level balanced and consistent.

Use too much too frequently and it can lead to unsafe water but use too little and not frequently enough and the pool will start to draw minerals from the finish on your pool, leaving you with a faded finish. And that’s before we even mention algae, which will turn crystal-clear pool water into an uninviting green over time.

Think about the regularity of servicing your pool like taking out your recycling for the weekly collection. If you miss one week, it’s not much of an issue but if you leave it multiple weeks, the recycling starts to pile up and becomes unsightly and unmanageable.   

This is an analogy that quite nicely sums up the approach you should be taking to pool servicing; although it’s best to stick to your professional servicing schedule, missing one clean isn’t disaster, but overlook this for a few weeks, or worse months, and you will find problems with the water balance, and if it’s outdoors, you’ll also most likely find legions of algae and debris clogging up your beautiful pool.

The most frustrating thing about allowing a pool to lapse into a poor state due to lack of regular servicing, is that the longer it is neglected, the harder it can be to restore it to a healthy, safe condition, which can mean the pool cannot be used in the interim.  So, our advice is to have regular scheduled professional servicing, ideally by the same pool engineer so they can build up knowledge of your pool.  

'Regularly’ means different things to different pool owners, and it depends on your pool.  It’s not a ‘one size fits all’ solution.  Work out a servicing plan with your pool company and then keep it going. This will ensure that your pool is in great working condition and safe whenever you and family members want to take a dip. If you have an outdoor pool, be sure to include a winter servicing plan; even though the pool will be closed at that point, it still needs care and attention.

In between professional servicing, there are things you can keep an eye on and handle yourself if you so wish, for example, on outdoor pools, emptying skimmers and clearing debris from the water with a pool net.  Otherwise, you could find your drains and pumps getting clogged and replacing or repairing pumps and sorting out clogged drains can also be expensive and time-consuming.

It might seem logical to let little issues accumulate and have them dealt with in one big monthly service, but this can lead to problems. It’s far better to adopt the approach of ‘little and often’ attention and have any little niggles sorted out during regular servicing visits. This will protect the life of the pool.

A private swimming pool enhances the aesthetic of a property and is a fantastic place to exercise and luxuriate.  Keeping the pool in great shape and safe to use means looking after it through regular servicing and maintenance, which ultimately keeps the cost down.  Major fixes due to neglect result in unnecessary expenditure and pool downtime.  Let’s avoid both!

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